Pressure-Cooker Bone Broth

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Bone Broth

I’ve had a lot of requests lately inquiring about how I make my bone broth, so I thought I would share my method for those of you who are curious. I believe consuming bone broth an integral part of the Autoimmune Protocol, because it is a nutrient-dense, gut-healing food. Bone broth is a rich source of minerals like calcium, magnesium, as well as gelatin and collagen. In addition to drinking in the morning with breakfast, I like to have broth on hand to add extra nutrients to a lot of my recipes.

I always make my broth in a pressure cooker, simply because it is the quickest way to do it. Originally, I simmered a large stockpot on the stove for a couple of days straight, but I didn’t sleep well knowing the stove was on. Also, more often than not my broth would not gel when cooled (a sign of the concentration of gelatin in the stock, which we look for due to its gut-healing properties).

Once I started to experience the effects daily broth consumption was having on my health, I decided to invest in this pressure cooker in order to make the process a little easier. I’ve used this cooker every week since I bought it two years ago, sometimes more, to make broth. There are many things you can make with a pressure cooker, but honestly, I only use mine for broth, and I found the expense well justified! Other people like this cooker, which is a combination pressure/slow cooker–I’ve never tried it, nor do I own a slow cooker, but I have a couple friends that have it and love the flexibility.

Once you have a pressure cooker, you need to source some bones. Bones from healthy animals (pastured and/or grass-fed) can be easy to come by if you know where to look–sometimes its as simple as asking your butcher or farmer if they have any they are willing to sell you in bulk for a good price. If you can request certain types of bones, beef knuckle bones make great broth, but don’t get caught up if they are not the “right type”–any bones will do, as long as the source is good. I always save bones leftover from cooking bone-in meat and throw them in a bag in my freezer. I never worry about keeping the same types of bones together; everything eventually makes it into the pot!

Fill the pressure cooker to the fill line with water, add a bay leaf and a splash of apple cider vinegar. The vinegar is necessary to help draw the minerals from the bones. I don’t salt my broth–I like to leave it unsalted so that it does not impact the saltiness of the dishes I add it to later.

A big tip I learned after making broth for awhile, is that you don’t need to use fresh bones every time you make broth. This blew my mind the first time I read it, but it made sense, especially with the larger beef bones that don’t seem to break down after one cooking. I pick through the bones after each batch, and save the ones that are still intact. Every time I make a new batch, I’ll add a fresh bone or two to the others that I have saved in the freezer.

I think the best advice to get broth that gels consistently, is to make sure you have as many bones as you can fit in your pot. I like mixing large beef bones as well as smaller chicken bones because you can get more in there, plus the flavor is more complex. The less water, the more concentrated and stronger your broth will be. If you get a batch that doesn’t gel, don’t worry–stick it on the stove and let some of the water boil off. Some people are purists and like “beef broth” and “chicken broth” to add to specific recipes… for me, broth is broth, and I try not to get too hung up on the details!

Using a pressure cooker, let the broth cook at high pressure for three hours. When it is finished, I let it depressurize naturally and then strain the liquid. This is when I pick through the bones and save the ones that are intact, and toss the ones that have turned to mush. I like to store the broth in glass mason jars in the fridge. If it is particularly fatty, I will remove some of the solid fat at the top of the jar when I go to use it, but I usually leave a little, and it helps the broth keep longer. Generally, broth is fine for a week or two in the fridge. You can also freeze it, but be cautious if you use glass jars–I have definitely had some explode on me. It is safer to use BPA-free plastic containers, if you are going to freeze any.

Of course, this is not the only way to make bone broth–you can either make it on the stovetop the old fashioned way, or use a slow cooker. Hopefully, if you were looking to troubleshoot your broth making, this article has helped you get some ideas!

Ask me your bone broth questions in the comments below!

About Mickey Trescott

Mickey Trescott is a cook and one of the bloggers behind Autoimmune Paleo. After recovering from her own struggle with both Celiac and Hashimoto’s disease, adrenal fatigue, and multiple vitamin deficiencies, Mickey started to write about her experience to share with others and help them realize they are not alone in their struggles. She is a certified Nutritional Therapy Practitioner by the Nutritional Therapy Association, and is the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, a guide and recipe book for the autoimmune protocol, and AIP Batch Cook, a video-based batch cooking program. You also can find her on Instagram.

205 comments

  • Austin says

    When you mention taking out the bones that have turned to mush, what would you say qualifies as that? Sometimes when I’m picking through the bones from making broth I’ll find some bones that crush when I apply pressure to them, but if I don’t apply any pressure, they are still technically “intact.” Would you remove those? Or leave them in until they just… dissolve?

    I wouldn’t be that concerned except sometimes I wonder if it’s bad to have tiny pieces of bone in the broth? Or is that the point?

    These questions feel a little silly. But if you have any insight it would be much appreciated!

    • Mickey says

      Hey Austin, they are not silly questions! I’m pretty “thrifty” when it comes to reusing bones. I will keep them even if they are soft, kind of powdery-like (like you say fragile when pressure is applied) but not if they completely fall apart. I have noticed that if I don’t use some fresh or new bones, and only older ones, the broth does not taste great.

      I have heard of some people blending up the soft bones and drinking it. I think that is taking it to an extreme that I’m not willing to, but since we are cooking them down to extract all of the contents I don’t think it is harmful to have some pieces in there. I usually have some “sandy” remains at the bottom of the pot, even after being strained.

      Hope it helps!

      Mickey

      • Jill says

        Mickey, a friend gifted me your beautiful Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook. Yesterday, I got some large, long bones from Whole Foods. I cooked the soup for 24 hrs and just turned it off. I had added some herbs and veggies too. After removing the herbs, I also took out the bones, but left in the marrow that fell out. The soup is very fatty, and not “gel” consistency at all. I’m wondering if these were the wrong bones to have used? Or? Help? BTW, I also have Hashi and have been feeling emotionally low for too long, hence this Paleo change. I made several other of your recipes… The chicken sage patties, jicama/radish salad, avocado/lemon dressing on cole slaw, garlic mayo… All yummy.

        • Mickey says

          Jill,
          If the broth is particularly fatty, you can skim some off of the surface after it sits for a little bit, or easiest yet, after it cools in the refrigerator (the fat will solidify at the top). Did it gel when cooled in the fridge? It won’t usually gel when warm or at room temp. If your broth doesn’t gel, it just means it isn’t concentrated enough. You can boil it longer to reduce the amount of water and make it more concentrated. Hope this helps, and good luck!

          Mickey

  • Cheryl says

    Thanks so much for the detailed information. I do have a couple of questions, though. What size is your pressure cooker (in quarts) and how much water do you put in to begin with? Do you fill it up completely? My pressure cooker has a line inside, about 1/2 to 2/3 from the bottom that says not to fill it above that line (with either food or the water, I think) and if I were to let it cook for three hours, it would cook dry! Thanks for your help.

    • Mickey says

      Cheryl,
      I have the Khun Rikon pressure cooker linked above. I don’t use a measurement for water, I just put as many bones as will fit in the pot and then fill to the fill line (I think its around 2/3 full). I think your pressure cooker must not be working properly if you are losing that much when you cook. Mine is always at the fill line, even after cooking. If you have an older cooker it may be letting off too much steam as it cooks (I keep mine so it is at full pressure but not releasing any steam).

      Hope it helps!

      Mickey

      • ashley says

        I have a crock pot does this work like a pressure cooker?

        • Mickey says

          Ashley, no a crock pot is quite the opposite–it cooks things at a lower temperature for a longer amount of time.

          Mickey

  • Laura says

    Do you think good quality gelatin from Great Lakes brand has the same type of GI healing benefits? I used to make lots of bone broth but admit the smell now make me feel nauseous. I now have a tablespoon of Great Lakes gelatin in hot water/lemon twice a day instead. Just cruises on your thoughts…

    • Mickey says

      Laura, I think it is a good product, but not the same as broth. Broth has all of the minerals in addition to the gelatin–notably calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, along with collagen and amino acids like glycine. Although Great Lakes makes a product from grass-fed animals, it is still processed and refined and I don’t think it can be compared to real bone broth. If its the only way you can take it though, and you are willing to eat lots of greens and things like sardines with the bones to get those minerals, you should be fine. :)

      Mickey

  • Jenne says

    Awesome clarifying post Mickey, thanks. Planning on making my first batch this week.
    Am a little worried about 3hrs on the stove in a pressure cooker though 😉

    • Mickey says

      Jenne,
      It should be fine–just make sure that you can get it to cook at full pressure without releasing too much steam (I have to use a flame tamer on top of my burner because my stove won’t go low enough). Good luck!

      Mickey

      • Don says

        This is a great site, I found it some time ago and used it to make bone broth for my mother-in-law who shares your condition. Stopped in to look for questions about type of bones and was reading the comments and found this one from Jenne and Mickey’s Reply.

        I know Mickey is not a pressure cooker monster, but we all need to keep this important safety fact in mind: The amount of steam released can be controlled by how high your heat is. The more heat, the more steam, and this is critical because too much heat and too much steam exhausted equals out of water and big, big problems with the cooker burning and worse.

        Just let the cooker heat rise to high (15lbs) and then reduce heat to keep the minimum amount of steam necessary to maintain the pressure. Newer models have a button that rises and stays rigid, the older ones had the weight, jiggler, that jiggled. Just enough heat to make it jiggle. That saves gas or electricity, so important in our world today.

        And, that safety thing.

  • […] to extract all of the minerals, collagen, and gelatin that are so healing to the body (my recipe here). I also include liver in my diet at least once a week—more like 2-3 times when I am not feeling […]

  • Jamie says

    Hi Mickey,
    I “heard” you should add vinegar to extract the most minerals from the bones.
    True?
    Loved your post on Sarah Wilson’s blog today.
    Excited to try the pate.
    Jamie

    • Mickey says

      Hi Jamie, I do add about a tablespoon of vinegar to help get the minerals out. :)

      Mickey

      • Catharine says

        Hi Mickey,

        I know you don’t use the electric pressure cooker but i was curious how long to cook the bone broth for in one. Would it be the same, for three hours or less? Just wondering if that discussion ever came up with your friends that use them and what they said about it. And is it safe to cook bone broth in an electric cooker for three hours as well? Any thoughts? Many thanks!

        • Mickey says

          Catharine, yes it would be the same, I know many who do it and love that appliance :)

          Mickey

        • Sharon says

          I also use an electric pressure cooker which I love. But, mine only goes up to 2 hrs cook time. So, I’m going to cook the 2 hrs, let off some pressure and then cook one more hour. I think that will work fine.

          • Mickey Trescott says

            Sharon,
            I think that will be fine–I often make a batch for a couple hours when I’m strapped for time and it still comes out well.

      • Bronwyn says

        Hi Mickey

        I’d love to try this bone broth, but just wondering how you consume it? Do you just heat and drink? Or does it need extras added in for flavour…. salt, for starters?

        Thanks, look forward to hearing more.

        Cheers
        Bronwyn

        • Mickey says

          Bronwyn,
          I drink it by itself, heated and salted, and most often use it in soups and stews. I don’t salt it when I make it, because if you use it in a recipe there is the chance that you could end up oversalting the whole thing. Salt is best added at the end, so that things don’t get out of control :)

          Mickey

  • […] 4 cups bone broth […]

  • […] 3 cups bone broth […]

  • […] 1 cup bone broth […]

  • […] 1 cup bone broth […]

  • […] 3 cups bone broth […]

  • […] 4 cups bone broth […]

  • […] 2 quarts bone broth […]

  • tamara says

    Thanks for this recipe. Now that winter is approaching in Australia I’ve been curious to make this as a non-coffee or tea beverage for keeping warm. I’d always been intimidated not knowing what type of bones to ask for at the butchers. Thanks to the detail in your post I know what to ask for. Planning on giving it a shot later this week!!

  • […] try this with gelatin, which is only soluble in hot water). While I recommend homemade bone broth as the best source for getting gut healing nutrients like gelatin and collagen into your diet […]

  • Sheila says

    I’m new to all of this, so please bare with me if my questions seem silly! I roasted a few chicken breasts last night and I pot the bones in the freezer to make a bone broth. Do I have to remove all the meat form the bone? Will I have to remove the meat from beef bones, too?

    I’ve been looking through your recipes and there are many that I am excited to try! I am beyond thrilled to have found you!!!! Thank you!

    • Mickey says

      Sheila,
      No question is too silly! We all started somewhere. If there is a lot of easily edible and removable meat on the bones, I’d take it off and save to use for a chicken salad or something. You don’t have to get too aggressive about removing the meat–anything you leave behind will flavor the broth beautifully. Good luck!

      Mickey

  • Laura says

    Hi Mickey
    Would any kind of vinegar work for bone broth? What types of vinegar should we use on AIP?
    Thanks!

    • Mickey says

      Laura,
      I like to use apple cider vinegar. Any vinegar that is made from a AIP ingredient is fine (for instance, rice vinegar would be out). I don’t think balsamic or any other intensely flavored vinegar would taste good, so stick to something milder like ACV.

      Good luck!

      Mickey

      • Erica says

        You mentioned that you cook the broth at a high pressure for three hours. Would you be able to tell me how many pounds of pressure you usually cook it at? Thanks!

        • Mickey says

          Erica, I am not sure how many pounds. I cook it on high pressure in the Khun Rikon cooker I have linked up above. Hope it helps.

          Mickey

          • Don says

            Erica/Mickey- More safety stuff! Pressure cookers generally have two pressure settings that you will probably see as low and high or 1 and 2, or two jigglers, one a little lighter than the other. Either method controls the pressure in the cooker, and it will be about 8lbs on low/1/light weight and 15lbs on 2/high/heavy weight. That is very important as the pressure controls the cooking times, but also because even 8lbs of pressure is very dangerous, and 15lbs twice as dangerous. Properly used (enough liquid, not too much steam) and pressure cookers are wonderful and very safe.

  • Samantha says

    If I use the bones of a whole roasted chicken does it reduce the amount of nutrients? Should I just stick with raw bones?
    Thanks!

    • Mickey says

      Samantha, you can use them raw or cooked! I almost always use cooked bones left over from cooking bone-in meat. They give the broth a nice flavor :)

      Mickey

  • Quinn says

    Thanks for the articles Mickey! I was just thinking about whether I should get a slow cooker or pressure cooker to make bone broth & stews. In the old days, we use the stove top method and cook it low and slow. So, I was wondering the high temperature pressure cooker, would it destroy the nutrients? In your articles, it seems that is not a concern at all. Hummm, I still don’t know which one is better… what do you think?

    • Mickey says

      Quinn,
      Studies actually show that pressure cooking preserves nutrients, because the food is not exposed to heat as long as conventional cooking and all of the liquid is retained. With a regular batch of broth, you would be boiling it for 12-48 hours, compared to a few hours in the pressure cooker. Hope it helps!

      Mickey

    • Dianne says

      OH MY GOSH! I just invested in the electric pressure cooker and made my first batch of bone broth.. I also use it to cook beans and other meats. I absolutely LOVE my pressure cooker. I say GO FOR IT, get the pressure cooker!

  • christina says

    I did it. I made bone broth for the first time using your pressure cooker method because I had a pressure cooker from way back that I never used. And guess what, it worked. It gelled. I am very proud of myself. 😉 The taste is … well, let’s say it’s an acquired taste! I sneak it into my regular beef soup or into stews and that’s just fine.

    But why is my bone broth so fatty? It was super fatty. I put it in the fridge and removed most of the fat after it hardned. No problem. I am not a fat-phobic at all, but this was way too much. Is it because I only used “new” bones and quite a few marrow bones? Thanks!

    Christina

    • Mickey says

      Christina, your broth could have been fatty because you used new bones. Did the bones have some meat and connective tissue on them? I find that my reused batches have less fat than the fresh ones. You can scoop off the fat and use it for cooking, if you want!

      Mickey

  • Dianne says

    I made this today.. i have had some nice grass fed beef bones in my freezer for a couple months but been feeling to lazy to make it (because in the past i browned the bones first, then slow cooked them for 2 days on the stove top).. well, i got a pressure cooker a couple weeks ago and decided to google “pressure cooking bone broth” and found this blog. I was so excited I got up and did it right away, with bones frozen and all ( I skipped the browning in the oven part first).. I also used one whole chicken’s bones (had used the meat but froze the bones).. pressure cooked it for 3 hours and it tasted delish. ( i do salt mine).. super easy.. AND.. IT TOTALLY GELLED! YAY.. when i did it on the stove top it didn’t.. i’m so excited.. this is SO easy. and i have been wanting to incorporate bone broth into my daily diet.. Thank you so much for the post!

    • Mickey says

      Congrats Diane! I’m happy it helped you. I agree using the pressure cooker is so much easier than the stovetop method!

      • Sujata says

        Mickey, I have an old “Hawkins Pressure Cooker”. Can I make chicken bone broth in that? But the water in the pressure cooker keeps coming out as it is an old cooker+small cooker. I also 5ltr big “Hawkins Pressure Cooker” which is also an old cooker. Do you think using a “big pressure cooker” will NOT cause water coming out when cooking on gas stove? I have 2 “Hawkins Pressure Cooker” one small and one big- old one- but I want to use any one of these two. But I am afraid if the water keeps coming out when it is cooking for three hours I will be losing maximum of my broth going waste by way of its water come out. Can I use my big pressure cooker and try for cooking on gas stove for three hours? Is there any way to stop water coming out of cooker/leaking while it is boiling on gas stove? I mean if I put something in it (some ingredient if you know pls tell) inside the cooker, will it stop the water leaking out? I am asking this cause we have to use more water for making the broth and also we have to cook for 3 hours straight on gas stove. So please tell me how to stop water leaking out of cooker while it is cooking.

        • Mickey says

          Sujata,
          I am not familiar with that brand of pressure cooker and I don’t know what you mean when you say water coming out–there definitely should not be water coming out while it is cooking. All pressure cookers have steam vents, but you should be able to get it to cook at pressure without steam coming out (when that happens on mine I know to turn down the heat). If you are losing water, you might want to invest in a newer cooker. Sorry I can’t help more!

          Mickey

  • Melina says

    Hi Mickey,
    I’m new in your blog – found it very useful, Thanks for sharing Mickey!
    I read the article however, wondering if you add any veggie on it for flavouring? (celery, ginger, carrot)
    Thanks!
    Melina

    • Mickey says

      Melina,
      When broth is cooked this long, the veggies actually make the broth taste bad. If you are doing it on the stovetop it is fine to add them to the last hour of cooking, but no sooner. :)

      Mickey

  • frankie says

    All this is so interesting……..and I am also thinking about getting the pressure cooker you recommend. I do not cook very much and have never overcome the fear of using a cooker like this. After reading reviews I am seriously thinking I will give it a serious try :) I am wondering which size would be better for me…..cooking for one person. Any advice?
    Thanks for you blog….love it.

    • Mickey says

      Frankie, it depends on how much broth you want to make at once. I cook for my husband and I and so the larger cooker works well for us. You may want to go with the smaller one, or you could get the larger one and make some to freeze!

      Mickey

  • Why is it so hard for me to find good bones? I went to a local meat market and they only had bones that were 20% grassfed and 80% vegetarian/grain fed. I called another place who said they are “basically organic, but just aren’t certified”. Should I keep looking, or go with one of these? Or should I just use organic chicken bones? Those seem easier to find.

    • Mickey says

      Shannon, have you looked at a local farmers market? I would also check eatwild.org for a farmer near you. You may be surprised how many local farms are accessible these days.

      • shannon says

        So i found the bones….. they were $4.99/lb and I bit the bullet and bought 6 pounds. I talked to a nutritionist friend who was surprised that i was going to such great lengths to find grass-fed bones. He said that it’s the MEAT that’s important to be grass-fed, not the bones. If I don’t have an autoimmune disease, is it really that important to have grass-fed? Also, once the marrow falls out, the bones are still good to use right? I guess I’m kind of confused about which part of the bone is most important in making this broth. And last question….. do you eat that silt that settles to the bottom?

        • Mickey says

          Shannon, I disagree with your nutritionist friend, the health of the whole animal is important when deciding to use it to nourish our own bodies. It is up to you whether or not to use grass-fed, I still think broth made with conventionally raised bones is better than none, but if you can grass-fed is best.

          The bones are still good to continue using as long as they are intact. The marrow can dissolve into the broth, adding nutrients. I will drink the silt that gets through my strainer, but anything too gritty I leave behind.

          Hope it helps!

          Mickey

  • sally says

    Do you ever add any seasoning other than the bay leaf I saw in the pot?

  • […] to get more gelatin into your diet but don’t like making bone broth? Well, I still think you should be making broth, but gummies are a great way to get in some […]

  • Christine says

    Is it ok to use the whole chicken carcass including the skin when I make bone broth? I can tell you that it won’t kill you since I have already done that. But I thought maybe that isnt a good thing to do. I also dumped all the cooked chicken fat in to the pot as well. I desperately need to gain weight so I figured it couldn’t hurt.

    I have a hard time getting any other kind of bones besides chicken that are organic. Do you know anything about bone meal powder and if it is safe to use?

    Thanks for your detailed bone broth recipe and everything else.

    • Mickey says

      Christine,
      Yes, you can use the whole thing! If you use a lot of skin the broth will come out with more fat, which you can leave or scoop off when it is done cooking. I would not use bone meal powder, who knows how healthy the animals were that they use to make that stuff.

      Good luck!

      Mickey

  • Kehau says

    I do my bone broth in a slow cooker. It never gels up. Does that mean it’s no good? I add some ACV and the bones and fill the cooker with water. I never have enough bones to fill the whole cooker (it’s a large one). Then put it on low for about 12 hours. Should I do it differently? I didn’t know it should gel.
    Help? Thanks!

    • Mickey says

      Kehau,
      No, it does not mean it is no good, just not concentrated enough. You most likely need to cook it longer in a slow cooker, like 24-48 hours to get enough concentration of gelatin in order to make it gel.

      Hope it helps!

      Mickey

  • Dave says

    I use a quart of bone broth to add to my homemade chili instead of adding water…

    • Mickey says

      Dave, I love using broth in soups and stews, makes things so much more hearty and nutritious!

      Mickey

  • Erin says

    Thanks for the tips. Here’s one that has worked well for me — after making the broth, I reduce it a bit more on the stove and then pour it in a shallow pyrex dish and leave it in the fridge overnight. After the broth gels up firm, I cut it into small cubes and put them in a bag in the freezer. That way, I have individual portions of concentrated bone broth to add to boiling water for a cup of broth or to add to stir fries, sauces, etc. Very convenient.

    • Mickey says

      Erin,
      This is a great idea! I have done something similar with ice cube trays. Thanks for the tip!

      Mickey

  • A little tip on freezing glass containers: Just make sure to leave space at the top of the container instead of filling it all the way. I usually fill up to about 3/4 of the jar or glassware. And make sure that the broth in the glass is completely cooled down. So best thing to do is put in the fridge for a day, then transfer it to the freezer. Good luck!

  • Hey Mickey! Are you worried about cooking the broth at too high of a temperature in a pressure cooker? I’ve read that big temp create free glutamates (almost like MSG). Thanks!

    • Mickey says

      Nicole,
      No, because pressure cooking does not cook at a higher temperature than traditional cooking. It is actually a safer way to make broth, because the contents of the pressure cooker are exposed to heat for a shorter duration of time than if you boiled it on the stove top.

      Hope it helps!

      Mickey

      • Don says

        One more time, SAFETY! Here’s the first response when googling pressure cookers….

        “Boiling water can never go over 212°F/100°C no matter how high the flame under the pot. But in the pressure cooker, the temperature can rise to 250°F/121°C. The higher cooking temperature reduces the cooking time.Mar 23, 2013
        how the pressure cooker works | hip pressure cooking
        http://www.hippressurecooking.com/how-the-pressure-cooker-works/

        Information Is Our Friend! Let’s be safe out there. (that’s a great site, btw)

        • Mary says

          Hi Micki, Do you not think that this is an issue? I hope not, because I’m about to buy the Instapot and hope that I’m helping my health!

          • Mary says

            Oops, I meant Mickey!

          • Mickey Trescott says

            Hi Mary, I have an instant pot and love it, I think it is a great pressure cooker!

  • Lea says

    You have given me a reason to break out our pressure cooker which we got as a wedding present but sat in our cupboard for 6 years! I loved making it this way, but we definitely didn’t get it to gel so I was disappointed. I think I had too few bones, which are tough for us to come by.

    I’d be open to mixing in beef bones with chicken, but every time I’ve made beef bones there is a terribly overpowering smell that triggers my gag reflex. It smelled the same when I rendered tallow. Would roasting the beef bones make them more palatable? Is that strong smell normal? Thanks!

    • Mickey says

      Lea,
      Depending on the bones you use, the broth can be more “smelly” or not. You will have to find a type that works for you. I have found that when I mix batches of old and new bones, the smell is not as overpowering but I still get a broth that gels. I see a lot of people who use all new bones, and end up with a ton of fat and a more “fragrant” broth. I’d try reusing some bones to see if it will both help the gel as well as decrease the odor. Good luck!

      Mickey

      • carol says

        Wow, I’m going to try this in the pressure cooker!! By the way, about the smell, I find that beef broth smells worse than chicken broth. I always tell my husband, it smells like a giant cow farted in here! LOL But I wonder if the smell is less with a pressure cooker since it is basically sealed.

        • Mickey says

          Carol,
          I still notice the smell, but it is a little milder than when I used to make it in a regular pot over two days. :)

          Mickey

  • Dove says

    Hi there! My interest in bone broth is for bone density. I have a pressure cooker, and made some yesterday. However, it did not gel. I used about a third of the pot with grass-fed bones, and then water with a bay leaf…cooked it for the three hours. Maybe you could tell me why it didn’t gel. Thanks for any tips. I really like your website here, and am looking forward to trying some of your recipes. They all look delish!

    • Mickey says

      Hi Dove, it sounds like you did not use enough bones. I usually fill my pot with as many bones as it will hold (up to the fill line) and then add water. Gelling is all about the ratio of bones to water. I hope you have better luck next time!

      Mickey

      • Wendy says

        How do you store the ‘used’ bones between batches & how long do they keep?

        • Mickey says

          Wendy,
          I store them in the freezer, and I would guess they keep around six months. Good luck!

          Mickey

      • Dove says

        Thanks Mickey! I thought maybe that was the case, so this time i will fill it!
        Even though it didn’t gel, it sure was delicious…
        Great recipes!

    • Mickey says

      Hi Dove, it sounds like you may not have cooked it long enough. Did you use a pressure cooker? I recommend a few hours for a pressure cooker, and at least 12 if you are cooking in a regular pot. If it did not gel, all is not lost–just put the broth on the stove and boil some of the water off. This will further concentrate it and give you a broth that gels. Good luck!

      Mickey

      • Dove says

        Hi Mickey! Thanks for your website, it is great! I use a pressure cooker, and with beef (grass-fed) and chicken bones, the broth is wonderful. No problems at all. Filling the pot full of bones is the trick. Just enough water to cover to the fill line of the pressure cooker. I had not noticed before that you were also using vinegar (ACV) to extract the nutrients from the bones. Do you think it is essential for someone with osteoporosis? Just wondering, since the broth comes out well, jells, and works as a beverage or in recipes. BTW, it would be so great to see a list of suggestions like the one I see here, using the broth in making homemade chili. Thanks again for your courtesy and wisdom!

        • Mickey says

          Dove,
          You don’t have to use the ACV, but it makes it easier to extract the minerals from the bones. If your broth gels fine, than you can keep doing what you are doing. I know some people who are sensitive to glutamates don’t use vinegar because it extracts less glutamate that way.

          Almost all of my recipes use broth, so I thought a listing might be redundant, but I could add one here! :)

          Mickey

  • Michele says

    HI Mickey,

    I was wondering if any of your readers found success with your diet with lupus sun sensitivity and rashes? My daughter doesn’t have SLE but the doctors believe that she has Subacute Cutaneous Lupus, just on her right cheek – lupus only in the skin. I am willing to give the diet a try before putting her on Plaquenil, but it will be extremely challenging for a 7 year old picky eater. Has anyone had success in eliminating the photosensitivity and rashes on the Paleo diet?
    Michele

    • Mickey says

      Hi Michele,
      I don’t have a lot of data regarding who has been successful with the diet, but I think it is certainly worth a shot if the source of the problem is autoimmune in nature. Many have had success with Lupus, as well as autoimmune causes of skin issues and rashes. Wishing you both luck!

      Mickey

  • Nicole Moore says

    I can’t tolerate anything fermented, including ACV. Can I use lemon juice instead to release minerals from bones to make broth?

    • Mickey says

      Nicole,
      Yes, or you can make it without an acid as some people do. Hope it helps!

      Mickey

  • […] Broth – I prefer Pressure Cooker Bone Broth Leftover meat/canned fish OR Seasoned Ground Meat Fermented Veggies – Store bought is fine – […]

  • […] Bone Broth (drink a warm mug with some sea salt, or use in soups and stews) […]

  • Kiki says

    Hi I was wondering if you think I could use this recipe to make broth from deer or elk bones. My husband and sons are hunters and I like to utilize all we can from the animal that gave life to nourish us. Thanks!

  • […] ¾ cup bone broth […]

  • Linda says

    Wouldn’t making bone broth in a pressure cooker help keep the histamine level down?

    • Mickey says

      Linda,
      I am not sure I have seen any actual studies showing this, but I have heard anecdotally that it is more tolerable to those with histamine issues. It makes sense, since the broth is heated for far less longer than traditional cooking methods.

      Mickey

  • TSL says

    Hey Mickey – LM has just bought me a pressure cooker as a surprise (YAY! – no more 48 hour marathon bone broth sessions!) I’m very excited.

    When I googled ‘Pressure Cooker Bone Broth’, yours was the first site listed! Serendipity.

    Thanks for ANOTHER recipe :-)

  • Mary says

    Thank you so much for all of your info on bone broth. I have been making broth for about a year now, mostly because I love good tasting soup. I often do chicken feet only, that makes wonderful broth and the feet are very cheap at the Asian and Mexican groceries. I just clip off their toenails first, even though they “look” clean.. Another broth I do is just from chicken skin…that’s a great way to get chicken stock “for free” from something you might just throw away. AND I can usually get even 3 pots worth of broth from the same chicken skin. Obviously, the 3rd pot isn’t as strong, but it’s better than what one buys in a can.
    Beef soup is my favorite, and I have tried to make bone broth a few times. However, it often has a stinky smell that I just cannot get past. I believe it might be coming from the marrow, but I’m not sure. I get the stinky smell when I do fresh bones only (hardly any meat.) I like the flavor best of the beef broth made with beef shanks or short ribs. However, for the purpose of “bone broth”, I should be able to get good tasting broth from just bones, right? Not sure what I am doing wrong. (I am not adding veggies to it.) I have tried the French technique of roasting the bones in the oven first…either way I do it, I get that stinky smell.

    Any thoughts?
    Thank you! Mary

    • Mickey says

      Hi Mary,
      The broth will have a different flavor depending on the mix of bone types and skin in the pot–I find that mine comes out “stinky” some times when I use fresh, large beef bones. It could be the marrow, I’m really not sure. I almost always mix it up and never use all large beef bones (more because thats what is in the freezer, not because I’m worried about taste). You can add the veggies at the end to help flavor it a bit, but I would not cook them longer than an hour or so. I’d say if you know how you like it best, keep making it that way!

      Mickey

      • Marla says

        Mickey, I’m not sure how it would affect the nutrient value of the finished bone broth, but I wonder, if one roasts the bones in the oven first (i.e. 1 hr @ 350F) would that help with reducing the ‘stinky’ factor?

        • Mickey Trescott says

          Marla,
          Roasting bones imparts a delicious flavor, and if it is less stinky to you I say go for it!

  • tatiana says

    about how many lbs of bones do you put in the pressure cooker at one time?

    • Mickey says

      Tatiana,
      I never measure, I just put as many bones as will fit to the fill line. Hope it helps!

      Mickey

  • Michelle says

    Most of the comments mention beef and/or chicken bones….any problem with using lamb?? I’m guessing not, but just want to be sure.

    I’m feeling very inspired by your journey and your recipes……I have RA and while medication keeps the joint pain at a semi-manageable level, I struggle with the fatigue that goes with it…..looking forward to making some big changes with food and will be seriously happy with any change to pain/energy levels.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Michelle,
      You can use any sort of bones you have available to you, and bonus points if they come from properly-raised animals. Wishing you the best on your journey of healing from RA!

  • […] actually trading in my crockpot for one of these, simply because I love the idea of making bone broth in just 3 hours, and I’m all about maximizing cabinet space. If this pot can do both slow and fast cooking, […]

  • norma says

    If you dont add spices until the end, do u depressurize, add spices, then repressure? How long do u cook it the second time?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Norma,
      I never make it this way–I add the broth to meals and cook with spices then.

      Mickey

  • […] believe consuming bone broth an integral part of the Autoimmune Protocol, because it is a nutrient-dense, gut-healing food. Bone […]

  • Nancy says

    Hi Mickey! Thanks for the great tips!
    I have a question regarding cooking time. I bought the pressure cooker that you suggested. It’s funny … I grew up with a mother who used a pressure cooker and I called her to ask if I could have it and she said she had bought a new one!

    Back to the question: I put bones, water to the fill line and some carrots, celery and leek and spices and cooked it on high pressure for 3 hours. Once it depressurized I opened it to find that there was barely any liquid in it! The manual says that broth can be made in 20 minutes. Your thoughts?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Nancy,
      It sounds like your cooker may be defective–that should not happen! Were you cooking it at too high of a heat with steam coming out of the release valve the whole time? I cook mine so the second bar is visible, but not so hot that steam is being released. This may be why you lost liquid, or your cooker is defective in some way. I would call Khun Ricon, they have excellent customer service and I am sure will send you a replacement.

      • Jane says

        Hi Mickey
        Currently I am employed by a person with autoimmune diagnoses. I cook for her and am adhering to the AIP Paleo diet using your cookbook as well as Sarah Ballantyne’s. They have been an IMMENSE help! Thank you!
        My background is in nursing and i have read some information about bone broth and the question of heavy metals / lead leaching from the bones. However, another study that was mentioned stated that these lead levels are less than what is allowed and considered safe in our tap water which we drink. I cook bone broth from grass fed, no antibiotic, no hormone sourced animals.
        My question is this: Is there any medical reason, that you know of, why the soft crumbling bones used to make the bone broth could not be blenderized (into a cream-like soup puree) along with the broth for maximum nutrition? I tried it and the cream-like consistency was excellent, the flavor AMAZING!!! Both my employer and I tried the broth blenderized with the crumbling bones in it – both LOVED it – and we both experienced an incredible amount of energy after consuming it for hours.
        Thanks for any information you may have regarding this – it is greatly appreciated!
        Best to You – Jane

        • Mickey Trescott says

          Hi Jane,
          I know there were some stories in the news last summer about heavy metals and bone broth. Chris Kresser wrote a great article on this topic here: http://chriskresser.com/bone-broth-and-lead-toxicity-should-you-be-concerned

          Basically, I would make an effort to source bones from healthy animals, like you are doing. I would be suspect of feedlot animals fed questionable ingredients, but not pasture-raised animals.

          I know many people blend the bones into the soup and drink it that way! I personally can’t take the texture, but if your gut is telling you to go for it, why not! I would just take it easy at first to see how your system handles it, and don’t overdo it. Bones have LOTS of minerals, which is probably why they are so energizing for you–how cool!

          Wishing you the best!

          • John Dumitru says

            Hi, I just got finished reading your article on making bone broth in a pressure cooker. I am recovering from broken ribs, and someone recommended bone broth as a healthy addition to aid in my healing, and it makes sense! My question is about the bones left over. As I have never made bone broth at all, I just assumed that all the bones would dissolve if you cooked them long enough. So, wondering if I cooked them in a pressure cooker for longer than 3 hrs. if they would just dissolve eventually? Thanks, John

          • Mickey Trescott says

            John,
            It depends on the kind of bones, but in my experience they do not dissolve after three hours in a pressure cooker. Large beef bones last 5-10 batches for me, and never truly dissolve (they just end up brittle and looking kind of “spent”). Hope your recovery goes smoothly!

  • […] try to select bone-in cuts as they will add some extra flavor, and are great to save to make bone broth in the future. This recipe works not only with lamb shoulder, but would be suitable for a leg of […]

  • […] *TIP*- don’t get rid of the bones from the stew meat, use them to make a broth. They will add so much flavor to your bone broth plus you’ll reap the added benefits of the extra turmeric. If you want to go a step further, add a small knob of turmeric to your broth as it cooks, this is what I did this week and have been sipping on it to help combat those nasty nightshades! These are good broth making guidelines to follow. […]

  • […] and berries and I buy organic *extraction* grade beans from Armadeus. * Tamarind Nomato Sauce * Pressure-Cooker Bone Broth via Autoimmune Paleo {which is the same method I use when I make bone broth} * Homemade Chocolate […]

  • […] or don’t feel like eating a full meal for breakfast, try some nutrient-dense, gut-healing bone broth. Bone broth is a rich source of minerals as well as gelatin and collagen.  In any case, it is […]

  • […] I have a hard time planning meals ahead and the only things I tend to cook in larger batches are bone broth and stew. I store bone broth and stew in glass jars in the refrigerator or freezer. But to be […]

  • […] sweet potato or parsnip mash also work wonderfully as a base. You can also add a little bone broth and some pureed root vegetables to make a thick, creamy, curried […]

  • […] pinch of sea salt. Super simple and amazingly delicious! You can even thin this further with bone broth, add some herbs like tarragon and thyme and turn into a creamy […]

  • […] morning on low, along with whatever vegetables I have leftover from the night before. Add a mug of broth and a scoop of fermented veggies, or perhaps half an avocado or a piece of fruit and you have a […]

  • […] your body from the damages caused by autoimmune diseases. Some examples of nutrient-dense foods are bone broth, fermented vegetables, fatty fish, shellfish, and offal. While most of these are already pretty […]

  • […] 4 cups bone broth […]

  • Lori says

    Why is geletin/bone broth good for the gut?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Lori,
      It contains nutrients that the gut needs, thereby helping it stay healthy :)

  • […] Broth: I have replaced my cup of morning coffee in the morning with a mug of bone broth. I love the ritual of having a hot beverage with my breakfast. I like to have at least one mug of […]

  • […] 1½ cups chicken broth or bone broth […]

  • […] cooking day includes a roasted whole chicken over veggies, roasted sweet potatoes, coconut yoghurt, bone broth, ferments, tuna salad, salad dressing and […]

  • […] a pressure cooker that could pressure can as well was the best option for me. I use a Fagor Duo. Bone broth only takes a couple of hours to make and I can “put up” shelf stable broth as well. […]

  • […] changed in your kitchen setup when you adopted AIP? Honestly, the switch to eating more meat and bone broth was a huge one for me. It took me about a full year to get used to the idea of eating animals […]

  • Sherri says

    The book Nourishing Traditions instructs you to skim off the foam/scum that rises to the surface when you first bring the broth to a boil, as the foam contains impurities that will give the broth an “off” flavor. I have only ever made my broth with the stove top method, but I have a pressure cooker and want to try making broth this way. To address this issue when using the pressure cooker, I am thinking that you could bring it to the boil, skim off the scum, then cover and begin the 3 hour timing. Do you do anything about the scum/foam, or don’t you worry about it?

    Also, I have read about the importance of the stock gelling. You advise to cook it down to make it gel if it is too watery. I used to be kind of disappointed in the past when some of my batches didn’t gel. My thought now is that you are still getting all of the nutrients, even if they are somewhat somewhat diluted, and I don’t worry so much about making it gel. Is my thinking correct here?

    Thanks for your lovely, informative post!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Sherri,
      With the pressure cooker I don’t worry about scum–it happens on the stovetop, but not in the pressure cooker. Your thinking is absolutely correct about gel. Its nice when we get a good, concentrated batch, but it doesn’t mean that one that doesn’t gel isn’t nutritious! Good luck!

  • Thanks for this recipe–just about to make my first batch of bone broth in my new Instant Pot. I searched & found several recipes, but I like this one the best since it’s simply 3-hours on high, rather than just two or all the machinations of another recipe I found.

    I do have one question… when saving the bones, do you refreeze them? Thanks!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Auntie,
      Yes I refreeze bones many times, as long as they were cooked. Good luck!

  • Allison says

    Mickey,
    In a pinch, is there a good substitute for bone broth that I can supplement my meals with while on the AIP Diet? I’m thinking of times in which I’m low on bone broth but don’t have time to make new, as I don’t yet have a pressure cooker.
    Thank you!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Allison! Unfortunately there isn’t a good recipe replacement, as it adds a lot of nutrition and flavor. Store bought stocks are no where near the real thing. In a pinch, I will thin what I do have with water so I’m not left with a completely tasteless recipe.

  • […] Click here for a quick and awesome recipe by my good friend Mickey Trescott  […]

  • Amber says

    Does cooking the bones at such a high temperature kill the collagen?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Amber,
      No, on the contrary it extracts it into the liquid, so that you get a nice dose whenever you use the finished broth!

  • Monique says

    What are your thoughts on bone broth including pork bones? I make Ramen broth (no longer have the noodles though :-( ) out of pork neck bones and chicken. I have never read any comments on broth made with anything but chicken or beef bones. The broth us super tasty and jells like crazy.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Monique, of course pork bones are great, and super gelatinous!

  • Elijah says

    I am looking to buy a pressure cooker. I have been researching the best one but cant seem to find a definite one. Are electric cookers just as good as the stove top pressure cookers? Will the electric cook as good broth as the stove top?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Elijah! There are definitely benefits to both. I use a stove-top version, linked up above (Khun Rikon). A lot of people use the electric countertop model Instant Pot, which can also be used as a slow cooker. As far as I know they both cook broth equally as well.

  • Brandi says

    How do you store the bones after you have used them to make one batch of broth? In the freezer?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Brandi, I just have a gallon ziploc in the freezer to toss them in when done cooking/eating!

  • Guion Leach says

    I was making broths with just left over rotisserie chicken bones saved up, but never gelled. Now I know less water and some chicken paws are in order AND to try my new Instant Pot to make the broth instead of back of the stove method. Here is my question: I have a small fridge and the freezer only goes across the top. A paper clip would not fit in there actually in the freezer or the fridge. I have canned my broth in quart jars in an All-Amer pressure canner. I have heard that if you pressure can the already made jars in a pressure canner, they will not return to a gelatinous state. If I make enough smaller batches of bone broth with the IPOT, add them together to make 6 quarts, and heat them to put in quart jars, when I seal them in the All Amer pressure canner, does it ruin the benefits of having created a gelatinous state. Is the effect of the collogen in the human body then ruined? I don’t see many readings on saving their broth using the pressure canner, just fridge and freezer. Is that because of nutrition destruction or just not many people willing to “can”? Please answer soon, I bought two much meat and bones and won’t be able to save it, much less use bones a couple of times.

  • Guion Leach says

    I understand many like to keep it in cubes, but I do not have any freezer space at the moment. My question is does the pressure canning of prepared bone broth negate the nutritional benefits of making the broth to have a great deal f collagen and gelatin in the first place. Of course, canned, it would sill be better than nothing at all. But should I plan to buy and prepare just very small batches because they must be kept in the fridge (also small), or will I still get all the benefits of the gelatin if I choose to can. I understand it would not regell again, but will it heal the same as gelatin that STAYS gelatin? I really appreciate the fact that you responded, as no one else has.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Guion,
      I am not familiar with the effects of pressure canning specifically on collagen and gelatin–I think you would need to find a chemist, or someone more familiar with the changes that happen with pressure canning. I would go with small batches until you find out, just to be safe–and if you do find an answer, it would be helpful for our community if you can report back! Wish I could help more!

  • […] would have to say a slow cooker. I love using mine to ‘roast’ whole chicken and make bone broth. I’ve heard wonders about the Instant Pot and wish I had one, but since I don’t […]

  • […] would have to say a slow cooker. I love using mine to ‘roast’ whole chicken and make bone broth. I’ve heard wonders about the Instant Pot and wish I had one, but since I don’t […]

  • Guion Leach says

    Hi again. I sent a follow up question to you about whether pressure canning in a canner would ruin the gelatin and collagen effects of previously prepared bone broth. Again, I have no freezer or fridge space and would like to “pressure can” to be able to store long-term, but only if it will not destroy the effects of the collagen in the body. I have asked several sites the same question and no response. I assume they do not know, and/or I do not know how to get back to see if there is a response. With your resume, I was hoping you would know enough about the chemistry of bone broth to be able to tell me what the results of pressure canning the finished broth would be. I did find a comment that says you can pressure can 4 pints at a time in the IPOT which helps on storage space, but still my question remains, even pressure canning in the IPOT, will I lose the effects of the collagen. I know the nutrients will still be there i,e, minerals, but what are the effects of “pressure canning”? Please respond, I really want to know for future preparations! I appreciate any research you might need to do.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Guion,
      I’ve responded to you a couple of times stating I don’t know–you will need to find a chemist to help you! I’m a nutritional therapist and know much about nutrition and food, but not about the chemical changes that happen with cooking. Wish I could help more!

  • Nancy says

    I make my all broth this way as well, but only pressure cook it for an hour. It gels beautifully. Am I missing something by not cooking it for 3 hours?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Nancy,
      You don’t need to cook any longer if yours is gelling well, but more time will result in more minerals being cooked out of the bones and into the broth.

  • […] Pressure Cooker Bone Broth – Autoimmune Paleo […]

  • […] turkey roasts and often use the pulled pork in salads and soups or just as a quick snack. I make bone broth about twice a week from turkey/chicken roasts and either use some right away or freeze the […]

  • Jean herndon says

    I would love to make bone broth I only have crockpot or regular pot for stove. I had a pressure cooker before, but no longer have and unable to purchase one. Can you please tell me his to make bone broth with with either of these pots? Thank you for your help.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Jean! While I don’t have a crockpot, I know people that use them to make broth usually run for 24-48 hours using the same instructions. Hope it helps!

  • Beth Miller says

    Could I use vinison bones for my broth? I am not sure I can get organic beef bone here, would a store like Kroger carry it in their butcher shop? There are a couple of meat markets and a processing place not to far from there but I have no idea if the bones would be organic, I don’t know what the farmers around here do with their animals. I have a cousin who has grass fed cows but she won’t kill them, they are like her pets.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Beth,
      Yes, you can use venison bones! Have you tried checking out eatwild.org to find a local farm near you? Many people are surprised to find organic and grass-fed producers in their neighborhood. Good luck!

  • Julie says

    Hi Mickey, I’m really confused about the right amount of time to cook bone broth for the best nutritional value ( I have auto-immune disease but mainly I am using the broth to enhance my nutrition during chemotherapy). I’m using a pressure cooker and beef bones and you recommend three hours cooking but some stove top recipes call for 48 hours cooking. I think this would convert to about 8 hours in a pressure cooker. How did you come to the view that 3 hours in a pressure cooker is long is enough?
    Thanks, Julie

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Julie!
      Honestly, I have no science to back up my cooking time, but I can tell you that using a pressure cooker for longer than 3 hours the broth just doesn’t seem right. I also worry about the fats getting oxidized with all of that time under pressure. Its really up to you to experiment and see what feels/tastes/seems best!

  • Cory says

    What depressure method do you use? Natural, knob/jigler release or applying cold water.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      If I have time, natural, otherwise I run cold water over it.

  • […] sauce of olive oil, garlic, and white wine (if you’re very sensitive to wine, you can use broth instead) makes these little critters the perfect accompaniment to just about any […]

  • esteri says

    Could you please comment on whether there is a concern re. glutamates in bone broth. Should we be rationing how much we take in daily because of this? Does pressure cooking make it worse or better? is their less glutamate each time you resuse the bones for broth. I am finding I can use my beef bones at least 6 times. And here is a tip…I add concentrated natural fruit powder to it when warm and it becomes super healthy jello and sweet without sugar!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Esteri,
      There are free glutamates in broth, which can affect some people. If you know you have a glutamate sensitivity, I’d make broth without vinegar. If you don’t have a sensitivity, I wouldn’t worry about it. I believe pressure cooking is ideal as it lessens the cooking time.

  • Hi!!!

    Thank you so much for all the information.

    I’ve decided yesterday to start healing my autoimmune disorders with the AIP my only problem is that I don’t really eat meat for 10 years now… I am giving the gelatin a try, even though I really hate it, trying to focus on the benefits.

    So is it okay to take gelatin (I am aiming for 2-3 tablespoons a day) instead of making bone broth as I really don’t want to eat any animals and seeing them cook :)

    Also I got the Great Lakes pork one but should I get the beef one next time?

    Thank you!!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Pirina!
      While gelatin will replace a little of what you are missing out on by not consuming bone broth, I don’t think it is a complete replacement. There are other minerals and amino acids that are beneficial to healing, and it is a fantastic cooking ingredient. I was vegan for 10 years so I totally understand not wanting to consume animal products. I made the transition slowly and steadily, as there are not enough protein sources to healthfully do AIP without eating meat. Wishing you luck!

  • […] make my neutral-tasting bone broth weekly in a similar fashion to this method, using my Instant Pot (I let it pressure cook for 90 minutes) and store them in glass mason jars in […]

  • […] are your favorite meals to batch cook? Broth, lamb stew, squash soup, broccoli soup… lots of soups and […]

  • […] bone broth (when I’m flared up and achy I make a batch and I find it’s truly healing) and […]

  • Col says

    Hi there, I’ve made my first broth in a pressure cooker for 3 hours and it’s quite clear almost like water I’m I doing something wrong also can you freeze the bones after you’ve used them once, preparing for a three day bone broth fast any advise how to get through this, really appreciate your help big thanks

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Col, it sounds like maybe you didn’t use enough bones? I like to pack my pressure cooker with as many bones as will fit, then add water to the fill line. Yes, you can freeze bones you’ve cooked in other meals, and even reuse them if they are intact after making broth. I don’t advise fasting with broth, just using it often in cooking or drinking straight for the great nutrition. Hope it helps!

      • Peggy says

        Hi Mickey….I’ve been reading through these comments and it appears that at some point, you switched from the regular pressure cooker to an Instant Pot. Is this correct? I am looking at buying one because so many people are raving over it in the AIP community. I think I saw someone say that that max time is 2 hours. Do you just have to start it over after 2 hours? Do you use it for other recipes that you like? I’ve got my first batch of bone broth on the stove now, but it would be wonderful if I can use the pressure cooker! Any thoughts would be appreciated – thanks for all you do!

        • Mickey Trescott says

          Hi Peggy – I have both! I like the regular pressure cooker for making bigger, quicker batches of broth. The instant pot has a lower volume and cooks at a lower pressure. I still cook mine for 2 hours, but I do think the IP will go longer.

          Hope it helps!

  • […] Are there any cheap gadgets or little tools that you have found make AIP easier? Cooking simply and quickly makes me the happiest, so I can’t say I use many kitchen tools or gadgets. In fact, I only really have two: my Ninja blender/food processor (hello coconut ice cream) and my Instant Pot for my bone broth. […]

  • […] most natural way to get collagen into your body. You can also click here for Susanne’s favourite recipe. The Instant Pot (which can be used as a pressure cooker or slow cooker) is another very popular […]

  • Amy Willis says

    Hi Mickey,
    I’ve heard that using a slow cooker for bone broth is more effective at drawing out the nutrients as opposed to a pressure cooker. What are your thoughts? I’ve never owned either and I want to make sure I am investing in the right appliance.
    Thank you.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Amy,
      I don’t think a slow cooker is any better at drawing out the nutrients than stovetop, but I do think a pressure cooker will get more nutrients out in the same amount of time. That is why it is my preferred appliance to use to make broth. Hope it helps!

  • […] not boiling foods for long periods of time I’ve also stopped burning pans, which is great! The Instant Pot also makes rich bone stock in as little as two hours. Before I was cooking my bones on the stove for over 24 hours. As a […]

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